Hair Loss Advice

Is the stress of working in London causing my hair loss?

By Alex

Hair loss is complex matter and there are many different causes of hair loss which can alter the rate and severity of which you lose your hair. Although most of us assume hair loss is natural and happens with age or that it is a hereditary condition, this is not always the case.

Some people can start to lose their hair much younger than expected and, as mentioned above, this can be due to a variety of reasons. One of the most common causes of hair loss is stress. We all experience stress from time to time, whether it be from work or from home.

Evidence shows that those working in London are more stressed than those who don’t, and this could be the cause of your hair loss.

Stress in London

Working in London can be stressful, from getting on and off of the tube in rush hour to battling though Oxford Street before you even get to the office, to then be greeted by a pile of work due at lunch time.

In Great Britain the total number of cases of work related stress, depression or anxiety hit a high of 44,000 cases in 2015, a prevalence rate of 1380 per 100,000 workers. London commuters suffer more stress than in any other European city, with four out of five workers being delayed on their journey more than once a month.

Stress is becoming the main cause of illness at work, with at least 16.7 per cent of workers complaining that their job is extremely stressful. With stress being one of the main causes of sick leave it is no surprise that hair loss in the capital is also raising.

Stress and hair loss

There are different types and causes of hair loss, and some may require more medical attention than others. Telogen Effluvium is the type of hair loss related to stress and is one of the most common types of hair loss. The good news is, as the condition is stress-related it is not permanent.

When a person experiences a great deal of stress, for example due to their work, the hair follicles can stop growing and lie dormant. These dormant hairs then fall out between 2 or 3 months after. If this period of stress continues, your hair follicles will continue to stop working and no hair will grow back.

However, if the cause of stress does stop, the follicles will resume their normal growth process and your hair should return within 6 to 9 months. If you have felt under extreme pressure at work recently and you believe this has caused hair loss, it is important to try and reduce the underlying cause of your stress.

Can I stop my hair loss?

If you have experienced hair loss in recent months and believe it is due to a stressful experience, in most cases your hair will begin to resume its normal growth cycle, so you should see your hair growing back in around 6 to 9 months.

If you have experienced hair loss, which you believe to be due to a stressful period, but have found that your hair has not grown back, it could be due to a separate condition. If you would like more information on how we can help treat your hair loss from medication to a FUE hair transplant please contact us for an expert, no obligation consultation.

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